County Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee offers opportunities to serve

first_imgName*Email*Website guestLabel I allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgree guestLabel 0 Comments Inline FeedbacksView all commentscenter_img Subscribe Connect with LoginI allow to create an accountWhen you login first time using a Social Login button, we collect your account public profile information shared by Social Login provider, based on your privacy settings. We also get your email address to automatically create an account for you in our website. Once your account is created, you’ll be logged-in to this account.DisagreeAgreeNotify of new follow-up comments new replies to my comments I allow to use my email address and send notification about new comments and replies (you can unsubscribe at any time). Name*Email*Website County Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee offers opportunities to servePosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Monday, December 9, 2019in: Community Newsshare 0 Two positions have four-year terms and one is for a one-year term for a youth age 11-20 VANCOUVER — Clark County is seeking applicants to fill three open positions on the nine-member Clark Communities Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee.Two positions have four-year terms and one is for a one-year term for a youth age 11-20.Residents living anywhere in Clark County can apply. People with experience and expertise in advocating for biking, walking, transit, active transportation, mobility issues, public speaking or serving on boards and commissions are encouraged to apply.Meetings typically are 6-8 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Public Service Center room 679, 1300 Franklin St. Committee meetings and other community-involved activities may require an additional four to six hours per month.The committee serves as an advisory group to the county council on matters relating to bicycle and pedestrian planning and funding as well as implementation of the county’s bicycle and pedestrian master plan. The group reviews future road construction and private development projects to ensure safety for people who travel on foot or by bicycle.Applicants should submit a letter of interest to Tina Redline, County Manager’s Office, P.O. Box 5000, Vancouver, WA 98666-5000. Applicants also may send information by fax to 360.397.6058 or email to [email protected] deadline is 5 p.m. Fri., Dec, 27, 2019.Information provided by Clark Co. WA Communications.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyVancouvershare 0 Previous : Opinion: ‘A data-driven’ response to Governors Inslee and Brown Next : Central Transfer Station closed for maintenance Dec. 11AdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

House committee hears Rep. Vicki Kraft’s higher education budget transparency bill

first_imgHouse committee hears Rep. Vicki Kraft’s higher education budget transparency billPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Wednesday, January 29, 2020in: Newsshare 0 The House College and Workforce Development Committee held a public hearing Tuesday on House Bill 2089The high cost of college tuition has prompted legislation by Rep. Vicki Kraft (R-Vancouver) that seeks to give the public a clearer view of what is included in individual four-year public college and university budgets in Washington state.Rep. Vicki Kraft, R-Vancouver, testifies before the House College and Workforce Development Committee on House Bill 2089, a measure she introduced to create more transparency in higher education budgets and expenses. Photo courtesy of Washington State House Republican CommunicationsRep. Vicki Kraft, R-Vancouver, testifies before the House College and Workforce Development Committee on House Bill 2089, a measure she introduced to create more transparency in higher education budgets and expenses. Photo courtesy of Washington State House Republican CommunicationsThe House College and Workforce Development Committee held a public hearing Tuesday on House Bill 2089. The measure would require the four-year institutions of higher learning to submit their administrative, academic and auxiliary unit budgets to the state’s Education Research and Data Center (ERDC) for public display online.“We hear a lot in this committee about trying to help students go to college and make it more affordable. It makes me wonder why is the cost of college and universities so expensive? So that’s really where this bill comes from — putting transparency in the process,” said Kraft, R-Vancouver, a member of the College and Workforce Development Committee who testified Tuesday.“This bill would create a more transparent look at what the four-year institutions of higher education have for expenses and revenue, so we can see that and really drill down into the department level costs,” added Kraft.The ERDC compiles data about students as they move through school to the workforce. The bill would require both revenue and expenditures to be displayed on its website. The higher education institutions are directed by the bill to submit their budget information to ERDC within 60 days after it has been adopted by their respective boards of trustees. The institutions would also be required to provide a link on their websites to the budget information on the ERDC website that includes a description of the information.“This would help students, parents, legislators and other interested citizens to understand what the true cost drivers are,” said Kraft, “and it brings a further level of accountability from our higher ed institutions to those that they serve.”The committee has until Feb. 7 to take action on the bill.Information provided by Washington State House Republican Communications, houserepublicans.wa.govAdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestVancouvershare 0 Previous : Letter: ‘The secret is out about Ridgefield and what a wonderful place it is to live and raise a family’ Next : Five bills from Rep. Brandon Vick move a step closer to House floorAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

Restaurants, gaming to remain open at ilani during state restriction period

first_imgRestaurants, gaming to remain open at ilani during state restriction periodPosted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Wednesday, November 18, 2020in: Businessshare 0 Casino does not have to adhere to the governor’s latest mandate.There will be at least a few restaurants that will remain open in Southwest Washington during the four-week restriction period called for by the governor on Sunday.The governor’s latest mandate does not affect ilani’s operations as the casino is on sovereign land, run by the Cowlitz Indian Tribe.After closing for 70 days earlier in the pandemic, ilani officials say the casino will not close during the latest restriction period that the governor announced Sunday. Photo by Mike SchultzAfter closing for 70 days earlier in the pandemic, ilani officials say the casino will not close during the latest restriction period that the governor announced Sunday. Photo by Mike SchultzThe entertainment destination will remain open during the four-week period of restrictions in the state, ilani announced Tuesday evening. That includes its restaurants. Kara Fox-LaRose, president and general manager said “ilani is poised to maintain operation with our extensive health and safety protocols in place, which have proven effective in avoiding significant outbreaks since our reopening back in May.”The governor’s office, among other restrictions, closed indoor, dine-in service at restaurants and bars throughout the state through Dec. 14.The Cowlitz Indian Tribe noted that ilani did voluntarily close for 70 days earlier in the year. That closure had a drastic impact on the tribe and surrounding communities.Among the safety protocols at ilani are the powering off of several gaming machines, ensuring social distancing between guests. Photo by Mike SchultzAmong the safety protocols at ilani are the powering off of several gaming machines, ensuring social distancing between guests. Photo by Mike SchultzResources are allocated to tribal health care, education, elder programs, infrastructure improvements, and more, all of which put the Cowlitz people on the path of self reliance, according to the press release sent out by ilani.“ilani is an essential tribal operation that keeps many of our other vital programs running,” said Philip Harju, chairman of the tribe. “Tribes are facing significant hardship in Washington State, and they and their businesses bear immense responsibilities in providing for their tribal members. Moreover, ilani helps the Cowlitz Tribe support important services and programs for our wider community.”The tribe and ilani have instituted a number of safety measures to help protect all who visit the facility. Guests and team members are required to follow distancing guidelines and wear a face covering. Also, ilani banned smoking in July, and that ban remains in effect.Other safety measures include:Reduced and distance seating at all restaurantsPowering off gaming machines to allow for more distance between casino players.Entrances equipped with thermal temperature checks.Increased number of hand sanitizer stations.Frequent sanitizing of all high-touch surfaces.Plexiglass barriers throughout the property, including table games.Approximately 1,500 people are employed at ilani, most of whom are non-tribal members.Kara Fox-LaRose, president and GM of ilani, shown here earlier this year, said team members rely on ilani for their livelihoods, as do resident businesses, including restaurants and retailers. Therefore, ilani will not close during the state’s latest restrictions. Photo by Mike SchultzKara Fox-LaRose, president and GM of ilani, shown here earlier this year, said team members rely on ilani for their livelihoods, as do resident businesses, including restaurants and retailers. Therefore, ilani will not close during the state’s latest restrictions. Photo by Mike Schultz“Our team members rely on ilani for their livelihoods, as do our resident businesses, including restaurants and retailers,” Fox-LaRose said, noting that ilani has become an integral part of the Southwest Washington community. “I’m very proud of the work we’ve done to ensure we can provide a safe and comfortable environment that brings joy to our guests and team members in challenging times.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLa CenterLatestRidgefieldshare 0 Previous : Vancouver City Council approves $1.3 billion budget for next two years Next : Caring community rallies for a friend with COVID-19AdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

Chateau Montelena Winery Announces New Winemaker

first_imgAdvertisementMatthew Crafton Takes on Winemaker Role at Historic Napa Valley WineryCalistoga, Calif., June 16, 2014 — Chateau Montelena Winery is proud to announce the promotion of Matthew Crafton from Assistant Winemaker to Winemaker. Crafton will continue to work under the guidance of Chateau Montelena’s CEO and Master Winemaker Bo Barrett with the support of Vineyard Manager Dave Vella.In 2006, Crafton moved to Napa Valley from Virginia to expand his wine industry experience, starting as a Viticulture Intern at Etude Wines. He joined the Chateau Montelena team in 2008 as Assistant Winemaker and started leading Chateau Montelena’s famous Chardonnay program. Crafton’s educational background includes a B.S. in Viticulture and Enology from UC Davis and a B.A. in Economics from the University of Virginia. An East Coast native, Crafton has worked in vineyards and cellars for over a decade from coast to coast.Chateau Montelena has a long history of promoting winemakers from within – Bo Barrett worked for both Miljenko “Mike” Grgich in the early 1970’s, and then with Jerry Luper before his promotion to winemaker in 1982. Crafton’s immediate predecessor Cameron Parry was understudy to Bo before his promotion in 2008, and Crafton spent the past six years training under Parry.“My father Jim was a Submarine Officer in the U.S. Navy and he instilled at Chateau Montelena the philosophy to ‘Train for Command.’ From day one, the Montelena winemaking staff has always sought out the most promising individuals who are driven, not only for individual excellence, but also teamwork. It takes more than one person to work a ship and the same goes for producing world-class wines. After working alongside and observing Matt’s performance through six vintages, including the high workload in 2010 and 2011, we are very confident he will excel in his new position as Montelena’s winemaker – after all, he’s Montelena trained.”Crafton adds, “I am beyond excited about my new position at Chateau Montelena and look forward to many more great vintages with the team. I support everything Chateau Montelena believes in from our sustainability practices, to the level of quality we hold our wines to, and to providing a safe, fun environment to work in.”Crafton resides in Napa with his wife Julie and two sons, William and Benjamin. When not producing world-class wines at Chateau Montelena, Crafton enjoys being outdoors, whether it is with his kids on his own urban farm, or exploring the wine country’s geographical bounty. Crafton winds down with his wine alternatives of Earl Grey tea or whiskey, depending on the day.About Chateau Montelena Winery Established in 1882 by Alfred Tubbs, Calistoga-based Chateau Montelena is credited for helping California wine earn worldwide recognition. In 1976, Chateau Montelena was one of two Napa Valley wineries to come out on top in a blind tasting held for a who’s-who of the French wine and food establishment gathered at the Inter-Continental Hotel in Paris. Chateau Montelena produces Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, Zinfandel and Riesling varietals. Its celebrated tasting room is open daily from 9:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. The winery has been owned and operated by the Barrett Family since 1972. For more information on Chateau Montelena, please visit: www.montelena.com.Advertisement Linkedin TAGSChateau Montelena WineryMatthew CraftonNapapeople Twitter Facebook Share ReddIt Pinterest Home Industry News Releases Chateau Montelena Winery Announces New WinemakerIndustry News ReleasesWine BusinessChateau Montelena Winery Announces New WinemakerBy Press Release – June 16, 2014 78 0 Email Previous articleAfternoon Brief, June 13Next articleGeni Whitehouse to lead Women for WineSense’s Roundtable Meeting Press Releaselast_img read more

Ramifications of Bad Customer Service

first_img TAGSE ColumnElizabeth Slater Facebook Share ReddIt Advertisement AdvertisementAs I was wandering through the Internet I found some great information on customer service on Help Scout. The article was actually a compilation of quotes, facts and statistics from different companies and individuals focused on the ramifications of bad customer service and the benefits of positive engagement with customers. I thought I would pull some of these out for this week’s blog.American Express Customer Service Barometer (2017) – “More than half of Americans have scrapped a planned purchase transaction because of bad service.”Salesforce – “74% of people are likely to switch brands if they find the purchasing process too difficult”New Voice Media – “After one negative experience, 51% of customers will never do business with that company again. “, “U.S. companies lose more than $62 billion annually due to poor customer service.”Those are some powerful numbers and some amazing findings, showing that the attitude companies have towards the importance of positive engagement with customers can seriously affect the bottom line.It’s important to spend time accessing your company’s customer service through all lines of communication: in person, via email, phone, mail, on social media and in any other ways that you are in touch with your customers.Every person who works for the winery, no matter what their job is responsible for being available to help customers if they come into contact with them. Each and every employee should have some customer service training. Though employees who work in the cellar or in the back office may not encounter many visitors, if they happen to run into a visitor, they should make eye contact, smile and be available to help if needed (even if it is merely directing someone to where they want to go).How long has it been since you did a customer service review in your business? Are you overseeing at least one customer service training session per year for all your employees and offering more training for those who are on the front lines of customer interaction?Good customer engagement will raise your sales, according to the 2017 Customer Service Barometer from American Express 7 out of 10 U.S. consumers say they’ve spent more money to do business with a company that delivers good serviceA simple upgrade to your customer service should mean more wine sold, more return customers and a strong uptick to your bottom line.A tip of the glass from me to you.E Columnby Elizabeth “E” Slater, In Short Direct MarketingA recognized expert in the fields of direct marketing and sales in the wine marketplace. Slater has taught more wineries and winery associations how to create and improve the effectiveness of their direct marketing programs and to make the most of each customer’s potential than anyone in the wine industry today.Follow E on twitter @esavant and facebook. Emailcenter_img Pinterest Twitter Home Wine Business Editorial E Column Ramifications of Bad Customer ServiceWine Business EditorialE ColumnRamifications of Bad Customer ServiceBy Elizabeth Slater – October 24, 2018 31 0 Linkedin Previous articleAfternoon Brief, October 23Next articleUSDA Announces Update to National Road Map for Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Elizabeth Slaterlast_img read more

Ji gets first win since ’09 U.S. Women’s Open

first_imgTAIPEI, Taiwan – Eun-Hee Ji fired a 7-under-par 65 to win the Taiwan Championship on Sunday for her first LPGA title since the 2009 U.S. Women’s Open. Ji, who had a six-stroke lead heading into the final round, carded seven birdies to finish at 17-under 271, six strokes ahead of Lydia Ko, who also closed with a 65. ”I’m so happy and excited because I haven’t won for the past eight years,” said Ji. ”So I was waiting for this moment for so long, so I’m super happy right now.” Ji’s six-stroke margin of victory ties the largest of the 2017 season, joining the previous mark set by Mirim Lee at the Kia Classic. Full-field scores from the Swinging Skirts LPGA Taiwan Championship Ko birdied her last two holes. ”I’ll still take a birdie on the finishing hole,” said Ko. ”When I was on 17 tee I said I want to finish with two birdies, and I was able to do that. I played really solid today.” Top-ranked So Yeon Ryu also shot a bogey-free 65 to move into a tie for third place with Lizette Salas and Carlota Ciganda. Sung Hyun Park, the U.S. LPGA rookie of the year, shot a 71 to finish well back at 5 over while defending champion Ha Na Jang was a further stroke behind after closing with a 68. LPGA veteran Jenny Shin, who started the final round tied for second, struggled with the conditions and fell into a tie for 14th after a 73.last_img read more

Opening of Bad Rock Canyon Ziplines Postponed Until Spring

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. An unfinished zipline attraction towering over U.S. Highway 2 near Columbia Heights will not open this summer as planned, according to owner and developer Reno Baldwin, who said he is hopeful visitors will be zipping through Bad Rock Canyon by next spring.Motorists along the narrow corridor of U.S. 2 near Hungry Horse may have noticed the 70-foot structure just north of the House of Mystery and Montana Vortex – both popular visitor attractions – and wondered about its provenance.Baldwin, the former owner of Great Northern Raft Co., said he has been designing the blueprint for Glacier Zipline Adventures for five years, and recently entered into a five-year lease with the Montana Department of Transportation, which owns the land’s right of way, for approximately 40 acres of land.The zipline tour will begin atop a platform on the 70-foot tower visible from the highway, and ferries harnessed visitors to other platforms affixed to trees along the course. In order to gain enough elevation to complete the tour, Baldwin’s contractors built spiral staircases on old-growth larch trees, which visitors must climb up to access the final platforms.Baldwin said the ziplines and platforms are not bolted to the trees, but use a weight-sensitive winching system that fastens to the trees and increases tension as weight is applied.But the logistics of constructing multi-tiered zipline attraction were more complex than Baldwin envisioned, and a projected July 2014 opening was not practical, he said; rather than rush the project he opted to delay the opening until next April.“It took a lot more time than we anticipated,” he said. “When you’re building at those heights, you don’t realize how much more time it is going to require.”Baldwin will pay $20,000 per year to the Department of Transportation, a fee that will increase by 15 percent after every fifth year the lease is renewed. He is also required to keep the grounds clean.In addition to the 70-foot tower, the lease allows for a well, a septic drain field and signage. It also allows brush clearing and minor site leveling under the ziplines.Still, some residents and business owners have raised concerns about traffic hazards and distracted motorists along the constricted stretch of highway, which has seen half a dozen fatalities through the years.House of Mystery owner Joe Hauser complained in an email that the zipline attraction, which sits about 10 feet from one corner of his property, compromises wildlife habitat, Native American cultural sites and a well-established business. Hauser also raised safety concerns, and wondered why the project required no public review process, but was told that leasing a parcel of “surplus land” does not require public review.Ed Toavs, the Montana Department of Transportation’s administrator for Missoula, said Baldwin must build and maintain a 24-foot approach to the highway that complies with MDT standards. Access to the leased property is currently shared with a state fishing access site.Baldwin said he intends to hire a dozen seasonal employees to help guide the interpretive zipline tours above the treetops, who will offer visitors a thrilling ride and an opportunity to learn about the scenic corridor.“It really is quite a thrill to look down off of that tower,” he said. Emaillast_img read more

Glacier Conservancy Raises $150,000 for Dark Sky Program

first_img Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. The Glacier National Park Conservancy raised more than a quarter-million dollars for its namesake during its annual Backpacker’s Ball Fundraiser, including more than $150,000 to support the park’s growing dark sky program.The money raised on Aug. 5 will go toward the installation of a new observation dome at the St. Mary Visitor Center, an expansion of the daily astronomy education programs throughout the park, and the installation of dark sky-friendly lighting in the park, according to Amy Dempster, director of marketing and communications for the conservancy.“We are honored by the ongoing support of the businesses and individuals in our community who choose to support critical programs throughout the park,” said Executive Director Doug Mitchell. “These funds represent a significant investment in preserving and protecting Glacier National Park for future generations.”Glacier’s night sky education program has quickly become a popular attraction at the park, aided by a lack of light pollution in this remote section of Montana. In April, the Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park was named the world’s first trans-boundary International Dark Sky Park.Glacier spokesperson Lauren Alley said the park hopes to establish a small public observatory in St. Mary, possibly even as soon as next year, to help the park in its mission to educate the public about astronomy. Alley said the observatory would also include exhibits about the Blackfeet Tribe and its connection to the night sky.“With funding from the conservancy, this project is now possible,” Alley said.Part of Glacier’s designation as a dark sky park is a promise that it will continue to promote astronomy education, including offering talks and programs at Apgar, St. Mary and Logan Pass. The third and final Logan Pass Star Party of the summer will be held on Aug. 25. The event runs from 9 p.m. to 12 a.m. and officials ask for a $5 donation for a ticket.Glacier Park’s employees had to conduct extensive research as part of the dark sky designation application. Researchers took sky quality measurements in some of the park’s darkest areas. According to Mark Biel, Glacier’s natural resource program manager, most places within the park have an SQM rating of 21.5 to 21.8, just a few points below a perfect 22 for a moonless night with zero artificial light. The park also has to install dark sky friendly lighting that directs light down, not up. About 30 percent of Glacier’s more than 2,000 lights are night-sky friendly, and officials hope to renovate the rest of the lights within the next few years. Emaillast_img read more

Wildlife Officials Offer Public Outreach on Chronic Wasting Response

first_img Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. Sign up for our newsletter and get the best of the Beacon delivered every day to your inbox. In response to the recent detection of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in at least two white-tailed deer in Libby, wildlife officials with Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks are working with local officials and members of the public to determine the most appropriate response strategy.“We know the residents of Libby and folks around Montana are concerned about this discovery,” FWP wildlife program manager and regional CWD expert Neil Anderson said. “However, CWD is a slow-moving disease, and so while we want to be prompt in addressing public concerns, we want to be deliberate in determining how we are going to respond.”Between late May and early July, FWP officials submitted 29 samples of white-tailed deer and mule deer for CWD testing. Two were confirmed positive for the disease and another is suspected to be positive, Anderson said.To address concerns surrounding the contagious and fatal disease, FWP officials are hosting a series of public meetings in Libby in the coming month, with additional meetings slated to take place later this summer in Kalispell, Thompson Falls and Eureka.This is the first time CWD has been detected in the wild on the western side of the Continental Divide in Montana.The first meeting will be Friday, July 19. FWP will hold additional meetings on Aug. 2 and Aug. 16. The meetings will start at noon in the Ponderosa Room at Libby City Hall, 952 Spruce St.In accordance with the state’s CWD Management Plan, the agency has assembled an Incident Command Team that includes staff from Libby, Kalispell, Bozeman and Helena, as well as Libby city officials. At the meetings, FWP staff will provide updates on the evolving CWD Response Plan.CWD is a progressive, fatal disease affecting the nervous system of mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk and moose. If left unmanaged, it could result in long-term population declines within affected herds. All the states and provinces that border Montana, other than Idaho and British Columbia, have detected CWD in their wild deer populations.Like many wildlife diseases, CWD can spread more quickly where animals are artificially congregated, as is common with deer roaming in developed communities or on game farms. It’s illegal to feed wildlife in Montana, officials cautioned, due in part because of the concern about wildlife diseases.“Libby police officers are also staying vigilant on looking for sick deer in town,” Libby Police Chief Scott Kessel said, encouraging residents to report any unusual deer behavior.If members of the public see a sick or injured deer, they should contact the emergency dispatch center at (406) 293-4112, extension 0.For residents in the Libby area who have general information on sightings of sick deer, they should call the hotline set up by FWP at (406) 291-6539 and leave a message with their name, number, the location of the animal and the time they saw it.While there’s no evidence CWD can infect humans, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends not consuming meat from an animal that tests positive for CWD. The CDC also recommends testing deer, elk and moose harvested from CWD-positive areas for the disease prior to consuming.CWD is part of a group of diseases called Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), according to Anderson. TSEs are caused by infectious, mis-folded prion proteins, which cause normal prion proteins throughout a healthy animal’s body to mis-fold, resulting in organ damage and eventual death.CWD was first found in wild deer in Montana in October 2017. To date, CWD has been detected in Carbon, Liberty, Hill, Blaine, Phillips, Valley, Daniels, and Sheridan counties.To prevent the spread of CWD within Montana, FWP has established CWD Management Zones in areas where CWD has been found. Hunters are prohibited from removing the carcass, head and spinal column from any deer, elk or moose harvested from these zones unless the animal has tested negative for CWD.Chronic wasting disease is spread by virus-like particles called prions. The infectious material spreads easily between deer and elk, and can also lie dormant in soils where an animal carcass has decomposed. It is related to the same brain-damaging diseases that cause scrapie in sheep and mad cow disease in cattle.For more information about the state’s response plan and to view a map of its CWD Management Zones, visit its CWD-specific website at fwp.mt.gov.last_img read more

Elderly man dies in tragic accident in Ballybofey

first_img By News Highland – April 30, 2014 Elderly man dies in tragic accident in Ballybofey Google+ Facebook Disruption to cancer service will increase mortality – Oncologist Pinterest Pinterest WhatsApp Donegal retains 14 Blue Flags, Lisfannon is not restored Google+ A tragic accident in Ballybofey has killed an elderly man in his 70s.He was killed while he was working on a car at Glencovitt, it has been reported that he died after the car came down on top of him while he was working beneath it.Gardaí and emergency services are at the scene, and the Health and Safety Authority have also been informed. Today is the 30th anniversary of Eddie Fullerton’s murder center_img Facebook Previous articleMcMahon’s comeback put on holdNext articleDonegal Deputy Doherty says banking inquiry a distraction from water charges News Highland Twitter Hospitalisations rise as Donnelly suggests masks will stay ’til autumn Twitter Gardai investigate Castlefinn burglary RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR News WhatsApp Donegal hoteliers enjoy morale boost as bookings increaselast_img read more