Why ‘Find Your Passion’ Is Such Terrible Advice

first_imgAre you passionate about your work? Fulfilled in every aspect of your career? “By that logic, pursuing one’s passion should come with boundless motivation and should be relatively easy,” he said. If yes, congratulations! You’ve done what we all strive for but rarely achieve. As for the rest of us, there’s hope: Part of why we haven’t found our passion yet is that we tend to give up quickly on new things. The reason? Prepare for a hard truth: We’re pretty bad at most things when we first try them.center_img Dr. O’Keefe was part of a team that published a study in 2018 that examined how two different “implicit theories of interest” impacted how people approach new potential passions. One, the fixed theory, says that our interests are relatively fixed and unchanging, while the other, the growth theory, suggests our interests are developed over time and not necessarily innate to our personality. Read the whole story: The New York Times More of our Members in the Media > People “often assume that their own interest or passion just needs to be ‘found’ or revealed. Once revealed, it will be in a fully formed state,” said Paul A. O’Keefe, an assistant professor of psychology at Yale-NUS College in Singapore. Nonsense, of course, he said.last_img

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